BRAIN CANCER

Powerfully precise, non-surgical treatment for brain tumors

Sub-millimeters matter. Choose CyberKnife® precision.

When it comes to the delicate and complex tissues and structures of the brain, precision matters. The CyberKnife System gives you a proven, non-surgical option for treating your brain tumor while helping to protect your quality of life, including your cognitive abilities, such as remembering things and concentrating, that may be negatively impacted with whole brain radiotherapy. Delivering stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments with unrivaled, sub-millimeter accuracy, the CyberKnife provides excellent clinical outcomes in treating a wide range of brain tumors — in fewer visits and with a significantly lower risk of the most common side effects of traditional surgery and radiotherapy treatments.

Key CyberKnife treatment benefits

Ask a physician if CyberKnife treatment is right for you

You deserve the best possible treatment for your brain tumor. Find a physician in your area offering the CyberKnife System — and find out if CyberKnife treatment is right for you.

  • Clinically Proven
  • Robotic Precision
  • Non-Surgical Alternative
  • Enabling Re-Treatment
  • CyberKnife vs. Traditional Treatments

More than two decades of clinical proof

The revolutionary CyberKnife treatment technology is not new; the CyberKnife System has more than two decades of clinical proof and has helped thousands of patients with various brain tumors and metastases. The CyberKnife System is routinely used to treat conditions in the brain including, but not limited to, benign and malignant primary tumors, brain metastases, trigeminal neuralgia, acoustic neuromas and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). CyberKnife radiosurgery is even used to treat complicated neurosurgical cases, while maximally sparing healthy brain tissues involved in important functions such as motor control, touching, hearing and vision.

Demonstrated clinical benefits in the treatment of brain cancers and metastases:

References:

1 Wowra B. et al. “Quality of radiosurgery for single brain metastases with respect to treatment technology: A matched-pair analysis.” J Neurooncol. 2009; 94: 69-77.

2 Muacevic A. et al. “Feasibility, safety, and outcome of frameless image-guided robotic radiosurgery for brain metastases.” J Neurooncol. 2010; 97: 267-274.

3 Shultz et al. “Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS.” International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2015; 92: 993-999.

4 Gerszten P.C. et al. “Radiosurgery for spinal metastases: Clinical experience in 500 cases from a single institution.” Spine. 2007; 32: 193-199.

5 Gagnon G.J. et al “ Treatment of spinal tumors using CyberKnife fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery: pain and quality-of-life assessment after treatment in 200 patients.” Neurosurgery. 2009; 64: 297-306.

6 Heron D.E. et al. “Single-session and multisession cyberknife radiosurgery for spine metastases-university of pittsburgh and georgetown university experience.” J Neurosurg Spine. 2012; 17: 11-18.

7 Colombo F. et al. “CyberKnife radiosurgery for benign meningiomas: short-term results in 199 patients.” Neurosurgery. 2009; 64: A7-13.

8 Jumeau et al “Vestibular shwannomas treated with CyberKnife: clinical outcomes.” Tumori. 2016; 102: 569-573.

9 Hansasuta A. et al. “Multisession stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: Single-institution experience with 383 cases.” Neurosurgery. 2011; 69: 1200-1209.

10 Casentini L. et al. “Multisession stereotactic radiosurgery for large vestibular schwannomas.” J Neurosurg. 2015; 122: 818-824 – https://doi.org/10.3171/2014.11.JNS131552.

11 Killory B.D. et al “Hypofractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for perichiasmatic pituitary adenomas: Early results.” Neurosurgery. 2009; 64: A19-25.

12 Colombo F. et al. “Early results of CyberKnife radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations.” J Neurosurg. 2009; 111: 807-819.

13 Romanelli P. et al. “Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia” Neurosurgery. 2017; Nyx571.

14 Colombo et al. “CyberKnife Radiosurgery for Benign Meningiomas: Short-Term Results in 199 Patients.” Neurosurgery. Volume 64 Number 2 February 2009 Supplement.

True robotic precision for unrivaled delivery accuracy

The CyberKnife System uses an image-guided linear accelerator mounted on a robot that synchronizes the delivery of radiation with skull motion in real-time throughout treatment.

The CyberKnife Robot

The CyberKnife System uses a robot that will bend and move around you to deliver radiation from virtually any position and any angle. This enables your treatment team to target the tumor or lesion with greater precision.

Real-Time Motion Synchronization

When sub-millimeters matter, even slight patient movements or shifts in the position of the tumor can be significant. The CyberKnife System automatically synchronizes the radiation beam with skull movement in real-time throughout treatment.

Continuous Sub-Millimeter Precision

The robotic delivery and real-time motion synchronization of the CyberKnife System empowers your treatment team to deliver the optimal dose of radiation to the tumor — maximizing treatment effectiveness while minimizing dose to surrounding tissues, which can help reduce the incidence of side effects.

A precise, non-surgical alternative to whole-brain radiation

The precision of surgical intervention can improve outcomes for many brain tumors, but there are many cases where surgical intervention may not be possible — or simply may not be the best option available. Similarly, while conventional whole-brain radiation remains a common brain cancer treatment, there may be times when irradiating the entire brain is not the best treatment approach. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with the CyberKnife System can offer a powerful alternative in many cases, delivering surgical-like precision in a non-invasive, typically pain-free treatment that does not require incisions or anesthesia, and is completed on an outpatient basis. CyberKnife multi-session radiosurgery has been shown to enable safe treatment of tumors close to sensitive structures in the head and neck1,2,3,4,5 .

Insurers are increasingly covering the CyberKnife System for cancer treatment

CyberKnife SRS treatment is frequently used to treat the following types of cases:

References:

1 Gagnon G.J. et al “ Treatment of spinal tumors using CyberKnife fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery: pain and quality-of-life assessment after treatment in 200 patients.” Neurosurgery. 2009; 64: 297-306.

2 Heron D.E. et al. “Single-session and multisession cyberknife radiosurgery for spine metastases-university of pittsburgh and georgetown university experience.” J Neurosurg Spine. 2012; 17: 11-18.

3 Jumeau et al “Vestibular shwannomas treated with CyberKnife: clinical outcomes.” Tumori. 2016; 102: 569-573.

4 Hansasuta A. et al. “Multisession stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: Single-institution experience with 383 cases.” Neurosurgery. 2011; 69: 1200-1209.

5 Colombo et al. “CyberKnife Radiosurgery for Benign Meningiomas: Short-Term Results in 199 Patients.” Neurosurgery. Volume 64 Number 2 February 2009 Supplement.

6 Shultz et al. “Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS.” International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2015; 92: 993-999.

Enables re-treatment after previous radiation

In the event of a recurrence, it is generally not possible for patients to undergo a second course of whole-brain radiation. Because the precise targeting of the CyberKnife System significantly reduces irradiation of surrounding healthy tissues, CyberKnife may provide a safe radiation treatment option for some previously irradiated tumors.

References:

1 Shultz et al. “Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS.” International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2015; 92: 993-999.

CyberKnife® vs. traditional treatments

An effective, less disruptive treatment option

The precision of the CyberKnife System maximizes radiation delivered to the target — while minimizing dose to surrounding healthy tissues. The result is highly effective treatment that eliminates many of the inconveniences of other treatments — and significantly reduces the risk of the side effects that too often disrupt the lives of patients during and after treatment.

CYBERKNIFE VS. SURGERY

The CyberKnife System offers many of the same benefits of precise surgical intervention. But CyberKnife radiosurgery is an outpatient procedure that does not require incisions or general anesthesia. Most patients will not require hospitalization or a long recovery period.

CYBERKNIFE VS. CONVENTIONAL WHOLE-BRAIN RADIATION

Instead of delivering radiation to all brain tissues, CyberKnife radiosurgery targets the tumor(s) with sub-millimeter precision, protecting healthy brain tissues and reducing the risk of common cognitive side effects of whole-brain radiation. In addition, CyberKnife radiosurgery may be completed in as little as 1-5 sessions within 1-2 weeks, compared with 10-15 sessions over 2-3 weeks with conventional whole-brain radiation.

CYBERKNIFE VS. FRAME-BASED GAMMA KNIFE SRS

Compared with single-session radiosurgery with the frame-based Gamma Knife, treatment with the CyberKnife System can be spread out over 1-5 sessions, which may result in fewer side effects1.

Reference:

1 Colombo F. et al. “CyberKnife radiosurgery for benign meningiomas: short-term results in 199 patients.” Neurosurgery. 2009; 64: A7-13.

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